japanese

Inter-Institutional Exhibitions

NIHU holds exhibitions to make the results of research conducted by its institutes available to the public. Making the most of its character as a human sciences complex, NIHU plans coordinated
exhibits held in collaboration with one or more of its constituent institutes. In 2014 the following exhibition was held.

 

Inter-Institutional Exhibitions in FY 2015

 There is no current information.

 

 

 

Archives

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Minpaku Toy Expo: The Antique Toy Collection
(Tangible Folk Cultural Property of Osaka Prefecture )

May 15–August 5, 2014,National Museum of Ethnology

 

This exhibition featured items from the Antique Toy Collection,
an Osaka Prefecture Designated Cultural Treasure donated to the
National Museum of Ethnology by the prefecture in 2013. Consisting
of pieces gathered since the 1970s, the collection affords
a complete picture of the history of toys in Japan from the Edo
period up to the present. It is also closely related to the culture of
manga, which is the subject of much attention from overseas as
symbolic of the subcultures of Japan.

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Transforming Arms into Art: Peace-building in Mozambique

July 11–November 5, 2013, National Museum of Ethnology

Sponsorship: National Museum of Ethnology and Research Institute for Humanity and Nature

 

The exhibit presented an appeal for peace in a “from weapons into ploughshares” form. The works are made from the weapons exchanged for agricultural tools that remained after the end of the civil war that raged in Mozambique from the time of its independence in 1975 to 1992.

The Great East Japan Earthquake and Kesennuma Daily Life Culture

March 19–September 23, 2013, National Museum of Japanese History

 

Displays report on National Museum of Japanese History activities in the city of Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture, in rescuing cultural properties.

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Transmitting Memories: Tsunami Disaster and Cultural Heritage

September 27–November 27, 2012, National Museum of Ethnology

January 30–March 15, 2013, National Institute of Japanese Literature

 

NIHU participated on the Committee for Salvaging Cultural Properties Affected by the 2011 Earthquake off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku and Related Disasters based at the National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo, and the National Museum of Japanese History, the National Institute of Japanese Literature, and the National Museum of Ethnology were active in the rescue of folk artifacts and official documents. The exhibit introduces the rescue and reconstruction-related activities of the institutes and shows the efforts that were made to pass on to future generations the memory of the Great East Japan Earthquake through the reconstruction process in the disaster area.

How to Feel the Earth: Passing on Nature and Culture to Posterity

November 2011: Expo Memorial Park, Aichi prefecture

December 2011: National Taitung University, Taiwan

Organisers: Research Institute for Humanity and Nature,

National Museum of Japanese History,

National Museum of Ethnology,

International Research Center for Japanese Studies

Activities aimed at children are crucial to finding solutions to global environmental problems and promoting mutual understanding between different cultures. One such event is the exhibition of children’s paintings (now in the collection of the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature) that were submitted to the United Nations Environment Programme’s (UNEP) annual International Children’s Painting Competition on the Environment. The idea of this exhibition is to foster the sound development of children’s intellect and encourage their perceptivity and sensitivity toward nature and culture.

The Bon Deities in Tibet

“Scenes In and Around Kyoto”
(Rekihaku“A”version)

Painting the City: Kyoto and Edo

Part I.“Scenes In and Around Kyoto”
Screens and Genre Paintings
March 27–May 6, 2012

Part II.Famous Scenes and Genre Paintings of Edo

March 28–May 6, 2012

Organisers:National Museum of Japanese History,

National Institute of Japanese Literature

Paintings that depict medieval and early modern cities are valuable resources for study about the urban society of those times. Chronicling the historical development of Kyoto, the exhibit shows the “Scenes In and Around Kyoto” screens (Rakuchu-Rakugai-zu byobu) among other paintings in the collection of the National Museum of Japanese History. The Edorelated displays feature the representation of the city and its noted places in the “Edo-zu byobu,” ukiyo-e, shokunin-zukushi- e (illustrations of various craftsmen), and other works.

Karuta by Children: Children’s Environmental Painting Exhibition
on Biodiversity and Cultural Diversity

October 2010: Expo Memorial Park, Nagoya, Aichi prefecture

November 2010: Kawai Township CultureCenter, Nara prefecture

December 2010: IshikawaPrefectural Concert Hall

Organisers:Research Institute for Humanity and Nature,

National Museum of Japanese History,

National Museum of Ethnology

This is an activity organized for the past two years by the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature utilizing the posters produced for the International Children’s Painting Competition on the Environment (organized annually by the United Nations Environment Programme). Elementary school students from throughout Japan are invited to choose one of the works submitted to the International Competition, think about the theme of biodiversity the artist tried to depict and write their own message about that theme. The posters with their messages are put on display.

The Bon Deities in Tibet

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The Bon Deities in Tibet

July 2–Sept. 10, 2010

Organisers: National Institute of Japanese Literature

and the National Museum of Ethnology

Since 1995, the National Museum of Ethnology has been engaged in surveys and research on the Bon religion, one of the indigenous traditions of belief in Tibet. This exhibit displayed numerous documents and artifacts, including those showing Bon iconography and the structure of the pantheon of Bon deities and introduced the history of the Bon religion and its rituals.

Beyond the Boundary in Asia

Poster

Beyond the Boundary in Asia

July 13–Sept. 12, 2010
Oct 14–Dec. 7, 2010

Organisers: National Museum of Japanese History

and the National Museum of Ethnology

The boundariesbetween worlds take different shapes and forms depending on one’s perspective and position. Exhibiting the results of the inter-institutional project “Integrated Researchon Exchange between Japan and Eurasia,” this exhibit provided the occasion for putting our images of the boundaries around us in relative context.

hyakkiyagyo

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Hyakki Yagyo no Sekai (The World of the Night Procession of One Hundred Demons)

July 18 - August 30, 2009

Organisers: National Museum of Japanese History

National Institute of Japanese Literature

International Research Center for Japanese Studies

In recent years interest in creative culture and the spiritual world has been on the rise. As a part of that drawings and paintings of demons and the supernatural have been attracting attention and expanding interdisciplinary research. Hitherto the International Research Center for Japanese Studies, the National Museum of Japanese History, and the National Institute for Japanese Literature, have conducted joint research on demons and the supernatural, held exhibitions concerning the spirit world and collected related material and documentation. The results were exhibited here.

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The Museum that never was: Paper
Exibits from the Museum of Japanese Business History

May28 - June15, 2007

Organiser: National Institute of Japanese Literature

 

January 16 - February 11, 2008

Organiser: National Museum of Japanese History

In the years prior to World War II, Keizo Shibusawa (1896 - 1963), a successful businessman, envisioned establishing a “Museum of Early Modern Economic History,” for which he collected reference materials of the early modern and Meiji periods. Though his vision of establishing a museum continued after the war, now under the concept of “the Museum of Japanese Business History," it was never realized. In 1962, the materials collected for the museum were donated to the Ministry of Education Historical Museum (the current National Institute of Japanese Literature). This exhibition displayed to the public various paper materials relating to the museum′s paper manufacturing sector, and is a result of the collaborative project entitled. “Using Resources from the Museum of Japanese Business History.”

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The Power of Poetry: Japanese Poetry through the Ages

October 18 - November 27, 2005

National Museum of Japanese History

The Power of Poetry: The Worlds of Kokinshu and Shin Kokinshu

October 28 - November18, 2005

National Institute of Japanese Literature

2005 marked the 1100th anniversary of the compilation of Kokin wakashu (905), the first royal anthology of waka. It also was the 800th anniversary of the compilation of Shin kokin wakashu (1205), the eighth royal anthology of waka. This exhibition focused on these two major anthologies as a way to trace the evolution of waka from the Heian court to the medieval period.